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20 worst phones and tablets – 7/13/12

The 20 worst-named phones and tablets

These days it’s just not good enough to give your phone or tablet an unassuming name like the RX-5050 or M3420e. Instead, mobile device makers spend their days masterminding memorable monikers that are supposed to generate buzz. More often, though, they cause static or confusion. Here are the very worst of the lot.

Ainovo

Courtesy of Laptop

Ainovo Novo7 Swordman

Ainovo Novo7 Swordman
Like a knock-off breakfast cereal made by “Keylogs,” the Ainovo brand sounds like it was designed to fool shoppers into thinking they’re getting a Lenovo. But because one “novo” in the name is one too few, the Chinese OEM that makes this cheap tablet added another one for good measure. Don’t ask us what the Swordman part means. Though we haven’t crossed blades with this slate, the more boring Ainovo Novo7 Basic’s creaky plastic casing and slow speeds didn’t impress.

HP

Courtesy of Laptop

HP Veer 4G

HP Veer 4G
Generally speaking, you don’t want to name a gadget after something that happens right before a traffic accident. Unfortunately for HP, the name of its first webOS smartphone was particularly prescient. After users passed this disaster of a handset, the company veered away from its entire mobile strategy and hit a wall.

Samsung

Courtesy of Laptop

Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1

Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1
In a bow to Arithmomaniacs, Samsung gives you 200 percent more model numbers than its main competitor and separates them with just an empty space — no dashes or commas here. Even better, the number 2 is a homonym for “too.” The store clerk could hear, “I want a Galaxy Tab too, 10.1,” and give you last year’s model instead.

LG

Courtesy of Laptop

LG Lucid

LG Lucid
While other Android phones may drunk-dial your ex girlfriends without permission, LG’s $79 handset remains clear-headed even when you load it down with lots of apps. Even better, the Lucid can download your email while in a sleep state, a form of “Lucid” dreaming.

HP

Courtesy of Laptop

HP TouchPad

HP TouchPad
Hewlett Packard’s abortive attempt at a webOS slate was a failure from the moment the company picked its name. The moniker meisters in Palo Alto seemed blissfully unaware that “touchpad” has been used to describe the pointing device on notebooks (including HP’s) for ages. Consumers may have thought that the short-lived slate, which was pulled from the market after just 57 days, was just a peripheral. Or maybe they noticed the lack of apps, sluggish performance and ugly design.

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